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Thomas Barregren

Sweet from nature – the sweet jouney (part 5 of 6)

To reduce sug­ar and calo­ries, while main­tain­ing good taste, sweet­en­ers with a lot of sweet­ness and few or no calo­ries are required. In the fifth of six arti­cles about our sweet­en­ing jour­ney, it’s time for sweet­en­ers of nat­ur­al origin.

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Chemically sweet – the sweet journey (part 4 of 6)

Regular sug­ar can­not be replaced with fruc­tose, malti­tol, glu­cose syrup and oth­er bulk sweet­en­ers if the calo­ries are to be reduced. The solu­tion is sweet­en­er that gives a lot of sweet­ness for lit­tle or no calo­ries. In the fourth of six arti­cles from our sweet jour­ney, we look at arti­fi­cial sweeteners.

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Monster sugars — The Sweetening Journey (part 3 of 6)

In part 3 of the sweet­en­ing jour­ney, we have come to the ‘mon­ster sug­ars’. Here we find, among oth­ers, invert sug­ar, isoglu­cose and glu­cose syrup. These are sug­ar-like prod­ucts that are rich in calo­ries and have a high GI. From a health per­spec­tive, there are def­i­nite­ly bet­ter alternatives.

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Sweet alcohols — The Sweetening Journey (part 2 of 6)

Our sweet­en­ing jour­ney con­tin­ues! In the sec­ond part, we take a clos­er look at sug­ar alco­hols, such as malti­tol and ery­thri­tol. What exact­ly are sug­ar alco­hols and do they have any disadvantages?

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The Sweetening Journey – from sugar to sweetened fibres (part 1 of 6)

Part 1 of our sweet­en­ing jour­ney. How can the food and bev­er­age indus­try reduce sug­ar? And what are they going to replace it with? In the first part of the sweet­en­ing jour­ney, we inves­ti­gate what sug­ar real­ly is and then we take a clos­er look at alter­na­tive sug­ars such as glu­cose and fructose.

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E‑sensory for food and beverage producers

What is e‑sensory? And why should you care? If you’re won­der­ing, you should read this arti­cle, We will try to answer the two ques­tions in this article.

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How stevia extract is produced from stevia leaf

Stevia extract is a mix­ture of ste­vi­ol gly­co­sides extract­ed from the leaves of ste­via plants. In this arti­cle, we take a clos­er look at how ste­via refiner­ies extract and puri­fy frac­tions of ste­vi­ol gly­co­sides and then mix them into ste­via extracts.

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Sweeted fibres at 40× magnificatiopn

Sweetened fibres under the microscope

Food and bev­er­age pro­duc­ers’ dilem­ma is con­sumers desire to both remove sug­ar and retain its sweet­ness and mouth­feel. In the­o­ry, the solu­tion is to replace sug­ar with ingre­di­ents with less calo­ries but the same sweet­ness and mouth­feel. Sweetened fibres is such a solu­tion. It is a new kind of bulk sweet­en­er that is as sweet as reg­u­lar sug­ar, con­tributes to the product’s taste and mouth­feel as reg­u­lar sug­ar, has the same vol­ume and weight as reg­u­lar sug­ar, can be trans­port­ed, stored and used as reg­u­lar sug­ar, while hav­ing few­er calo­ries than reg­u­lar sug­ar, and have less impact on the lev­el of blood sug­ar than reg­u­lar sug­ar. In this arti­cle, we take a clos­er look (lit­er­al­ly) on sweet­ened fibres, and answer some ques­tions: What is sweet­ened fibres? What are they made of? And how does it work?

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The difficult art of sugar reduction

Consumers are demand­ing food and bev­er­age with less added sug­ar, and author­i­ties are also push­ing for it. But reduc­ing sug­ar is not as easy as it sounds. Sugar gives vol­ume, tex­ture and sweet­ness. If you remove sug­ar, some­thing else must take its place and give the same taste. But what to choose? Food and bev­er­age com­pa­nies that want to reduce sug­ar are fac­ing a chal­lenge. In this arti­cle we look at the alter­na­tives from a heli­copter perspective.

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Stevia and steviol glycosides

Steviol gly­co­sides are sweet sub­stances found in the Stevia rebau­di­ana plant (usu­al­ly called ste­via). Twelve ste­vi­ol gly­co­sides are approved as sweet­en­ers in the EU. They are not ener­giz­ing (0 kcal), do not raise blood sug­ar (GI 0) and are also of nat­ur­al ori­gin. This makes them an excel­lent choice for reduc­ing sug­ar in foods and bev­er­ages. Here you can learn more about ste­via and ste­vi­ol gly­co­sides. You also get tips on more reading.

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